Feeds

iTunes boosts traffic to Apple's site

Click wheel of fortune

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Apple is the fastest growing site on the internet, with traffic up 57 per cent since last November, thanks to the popularity of its iTunes music service.

According to the latest figures from Nielsen/NetRatings, Google and Amazon also saw significant year-over-year increases, growing 29 per cent and 16 per cent respectively.

MapQuest - which provides free maps, driving directions and traffic reports - had the fourth biggest growth, followed by online media site Real Networks and online auction site eBay. Yahoo, Microsoft, AOL and MSN rounded out the top ten.

"Fierce competition for online visitors continues to be a catalyst for the launch of new products and features," said Gerry Davidson, senior media analyst with Nielsen/NetRatings, in a statement. "They keep visitors interested and engaged."

Yahoo continues to attract the largest audience, with 104m unique visitors during the month, a ten per cent year-on-year increase. The survey also showed that the average Yahoo visitor stayed on the site for three minutes and 22 seconds. Microsoft.com came second, with 96m unique visitors, staying for an average of 43 seconds. The other portals in the top ten included MSN, Google, AOL, eBay, Amazon, MapQuest, Real and Apple.

Microsoft is the organisation that gets the most web traffic when the visitors from its Microsoft.com and MSN sites are combined.

Visitor numbers are a key consideration for advertisers considering placing ads on sites. According to the survey, Vonage was the biggest advertising spender in November, having spent $31m promoting its VoIP phone service. Lowermybills.com was second with $11.5m, according to Nielsen/Netratings' AdRelevance service. The other top-ten spenders included BellSouth Corporation, General Mills, Dell, Scottrade, QuinStreet, Verizon, General Motor and Netflix.

The estimated spending reflects costs-per-impression advertising only, whereby companies pay to have their ads displayed on the websites of other companies and are charged for each time that the ad is displayed in a visitor's web browser.

The figures exclude search-based advertising, paid fee services, performance-based campaigns, sponsorships, barters, partnership advertising, advertorials, promotions, e-mail and direct response advertising campaigns.

The fastest growing small site is image-hosting site PhotoBucket, which went from 1m to 15.6m visitors over the past 12 months. The second, third and fourth fastest growing site - MySpace, Facebook and Memegen.net - operate in the social networking area. Current events site Slate was ranked fifth, having grown 390 per cent year-over-year.

Copyright © 2005, ENN

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
BIG FAT Lies: Porky Pies about obesity
What really shortens lives? Reading this sort of crap in the papers
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.