Feeds

Santa running short on surveillance gear this year

Crisis at the North Pole

The Power of One Infographic

Every year at about this time, we try to bring our beloved readers a story or two to boost the holiday cheer. And this year is no different.

Our first heart-warming tale centers on an undergraduate at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. The unnamed student requested a copy of Mao's Little Red Book from the school's interlibrary loan program in the hopes of writing a cracking paper for his fascism and totalitarianism class.

Instead of receiving the book, the student found two Department of Homeland Security agents waiting at his parents' house. It seems the book along with the student's extensive travels set alarm bells ringing at Homeland Security central. The agents did bring the book to the house but didn't leave the material with the student.

You can find out more on the student here.

Our second story of holiday cheer takes place in Washington D.C. where the ever vigilant staff at Dulles Airport stopped a 9-month-old boy from boarding a flight with his mom.

Offensive diaper? Ugly baby syndrome?

No. The toddler in question couldn't board the plane because his name is on the "no-fly" list of suspected terrorists.

"We pointed down to the stroller, and he sat there and gurgled," mom Sarah Zapolsky told Reuters. "The desk agent started laughing. ... She couldn't print us out a boarding pass because he's on the no-fly list."

Of course, babies aren't the only ones to end up on the no-fly list. Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy of Mass, Republican Representative Don Young of Alaska and Democratic Representative John Lewis of Georgia are part of the not so exclusive club too.

(Perhaps there is a stinky diaper theme after all.)

And so are possibly hundreds of Peter Johnsons who share a flagged and all too common name.

The TSA has dedicated a whopping seven full-time staffers to dealing with the thousands upon thousands of mistaken "no-fly" incidents.

If you're lucky, you'll see Santa fly through the night sky as you're waiting at the airport for the guard to finish up the cavity check. Mistletoe never felt so good.

Our last story has Human Rights Watch accusing the US government of torturing prisoners in Afghanistan by playing Eminem and Dr. Dre for 20 days.

Torture?

That's like a bad ass, free festival. The fun, however, is sure to end now that the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) has caught wind of the music abuse. Read all the details here.

Well, friends, it seems clear that we all have a lot to be thankful for this holiday season. Please be sure to wish the government agents wire-tapping your phone a Merry Christmas or whatever when sending your best to loved ones. We're all in this together. Now we just have to figure out what this is. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330
If the person in front reclines their seat, this could get interesting
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
Price cuts, new features coming for Office 365 small biz customers
New plans for companies with up to 300 staff to launch in fall
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.