Feeds

Taiwanese firm to open UFO research base

Probing tree-felling alien visitation claims

Security for virtualized datacentres

An unnamed Taiwanese company is to build a UFO research facility in China's Guizhou Province.

The plan, reported by the Chinese-language China Daily, follows - albeit slowly - claims made more than ten years ago by locals who said they were visited by tree-felling aliens.

According to the paper, on 30 November 2004 some 27 hectares of pines were flattened on a farm in the Baiyun District of Guiyang, Guizhou's capital city. On the same night, steel pipes were broken at a nearby truck factory, and a vehicle apparently tossed a distance of 20 metres. A night-shift worker claimed to have been thrown up into the air by what he described as "an unknown force".

Or a tornado, which is what the scientists who investigated the claims later pronounced the cause of the damage to be. Thunder and lightning - no doubt, very, very frightening - also played a part, they said.

Still, the Taiwan-based business has nonetheless contributed CNY160m ($19.8m) to the city to establish a centre to research and document the night's events.

Scientists remain skeptical, the paper claims, citing Wang Fangchen, a biologist who visited the site right after the event, who said the scheme was "ridiculous".

Even local UFOlogists seem unsure that the events of 30 November 2004 had an extraterrestrial origin. "If aliens really came, they would more likely appear before our eyes politely than hide themselves," said Zhou Xiaoqiang, the Beijing UFO Research Association's secretary general.

"People often mistake planes, clouds and insects, as well as strange shadows on photographs, as being UFOs," he added. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
SECRET U.S. 'SPACE WARPLANE' set to return from SPY MISSION
Robot minishuttle X-37B returns after almost 2 years in orbit
LOHAN crash lands on CNN
Overflies Die Welt en route to lively US news vid
America's super-secret X-37B plane returns to Earth after nearly TWO YEARS aloft
674 days in space for US Air Force's mystery orbital vehicle
'Utter killjoy Reg hacks have NEVER BEEN LAID', writes a fan
'Shuddit, smarty pants!' Some readers reacted badly to our last Doctor Who review ...
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
Carry On Cosmonaut: Willful Child is a poor taste Star Trek parody
Cringeworthy, crude and crass jokes abound in Steven Erikson’s sci-fi debut
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.