Feeds

MP3.com founder opens net music archive, play service

Oboe not again

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

MP3.com and Lindows/Linspire founder Michael Robertson has re-launched the service that got him into so much hot water with the music industry back in the late 1990s.

His new operation, MP3tunes.com, yesterday launched its Oboe service, which allows users to upload their digital music collections to a secure "locker" and then access it for playback from any web-connected computer anywhere else in the world.

This time round, there's an explicit link between what a user owns - or, rather, what he or she has on his or her hard drive - and what they can listen to. MP3.com's MyMP3.com service offered the same functionality. However, it used a database of 80,000-odd CDs MP3.com had ripped to stream songs to users. Since the service's users were already supposed to own the music they were streaming, surely it wouldn't hurt if they listen to our copies, MP3.com argued.

The music industry didn't see it that way, and neither did the US District of Southern New York Judge Jed Rakoff, who ruled MP3.com had infringed the rights of the copied music's copyright holders.

Now, users have to upload songs first - using Oboe's iTunes plug-in, for example. Again, though, there's a crucial presumption: that what they're uploading, they own.

Oboe supports not only MP3 files, but WMA, OGG and AAC formats, and runs on Mac OS X, Windows and Linux systems. DRM-protected WMA and AAC files, from licensed digital music services, are not supported, at least not for playback, though they can be archived.

MP3tunes.com is offering both free and premium accounts - the latter cost $40 a year and enable music lockers of unlimited size, "no bandwidth charges", the ability to automatically sync your music collection and the locker, and listen to 128Kbps streams. The free version limits streaming to 56Kbps, allows uploading only through the Oboe Firefox plug-in and doesn't do syncing.

Oboe is available to users in the US and overseas. Like MP3.com, MP3tunes.com also operates a music store to sell you songs you can store in your locker. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Microsoft confirms secret Surface will never see the light of day
Microsoft's form 8-K records decision 'not to ship a new form factor'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.