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IBM wants Solaris to Linux converts

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The kind engineers at IBM have delivered a new tool for moving customers off Sun Microsystems' Solaris operating system and onto Linux.

The Migration Kit for Solaris to Linux arrives at no charge and can be picked up by business partners, ISVs and customers. Those interested in the kit will likely use it to shift Solaris C/C++ software over to Linux running on IBM's Power, x86 and mainframe systems. This toolkit complements a more structured migration program IBM announced in conjunction with Red Hat in May.

"We've made tremendous progress since launching our Solaris to Linux Migration program with Red Hat . . . and have decided to extend it with free tools for our ISVs and Resellers to help IBM capitalize on the growing customer interest and sheer volume of migration opportunities," said Scott Handy, a vice president at Big Blue. "IBM's migration offerings offer the company's Business Partners, ISVs, and customers new opportunities for revenue growth as they take advantage of the fastest growing operating system in the world."

That's some serious porting enthusiasm.

IBM, HP, Sun and Dell all have various programs aimed at mucking up each others' server or operating system plays. Discounts here. Services there. You know the drill.

If the vendor isn't careful, a competitive program can prove quite embarrassing, as happened to Dell earlier this year. We discovered Dell's anti-Unix ad campaign running on Sun's Solaris servers. Oops.

More recently, Sun managed to sign IBM as a Solaris x86 backer of sorts. IBM won't object to customers installing Solaris x86 on its blades, but they'll have to ring Sun for support.

Sun's Solaris OS has long been a target for Linux backers. The open source OS has proved especially damaging to Sun's low-end Solaris server business. Now, a number of companies have started to target the higher-end Unix apps with Linux on Opteron systems as well. Sun has tried to counter the Linux momentum by investing in a version of Solaris for x86 servers and by making its Unix OS open source.

You'll find plenty more information on IBM's Solaris to Linux migration kit here. ®

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