Feeds

Study suggests DMCA takedown regs abused

Surprise surprise

The essential guide to IT transformation

One third of all requests to Internet service providers to remove stolen copyrighted material from their servers could likely be defeated in court, according to a study of some 900 notices by two legal experts.

The survey examined takedown notices served to Google and another large Internet provider under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Section 512. Two provisions of that section require that hosting providers and search providers remove content and links to content in order to gain exemption from possible copyright lawsuits. The music and movie industry typically use a different provision of the section to ask for suspected infringers to be cut off from the Internet.

According to the study, thirty percent of the notices could be readily challenged in court on clear grounds, such as a substantial fair-use argument and the likelihood that the material is uncopyrightable. One out of 11 notices had such a significant legal flaw - such as not identifying the infringing material - as to render the notice unusable. Moreover, more than half of the notices for link removal that were sent to Google were sent by businesses targeting apparent rivals, the report said.

While the authors of the study admit it uses a small sample set, the conclusions support contentions that the DMCA has been used to hobble expression on the Internet, even among security researchers, who have an explicit exemption in the law. The row with media giant Sony BMG over its controversial copy protection technology had some researchers worried that investigating the protection would place them at hazard from a DMCA lawsuit.

If more Internet service providers published every takedown notice they receive, as Google does, a more statistically valid study could be performed, the authors stated.

Copyright © 2005, SecurityFocus

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group
ALEC will have to do without Redmond, it seems
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS
YouGov poll reveals terrible truth about the enemy within
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?