Feeds

Home Office plans for science to tackle terror

Boffins, your country needs you!

Security for virtualized datacentres

The government has set out its plans to use science and technology to tackle crime and terrorism. Home Office Minister Andy Burnham, last seen on the ID card campaign trail, published details of the technologies he hopes can be brought to bear in the department's Science and Innovation Strategy 2005-08.

His wish list includes RFID tracking, new scanning technologies, the development of a so-called drugalyser for roadside drug testing and a wider use of biometric identifiers. In particular, the report highlights the potential of gene analysis to help identify a person by suggesting details of their "physical characteristics and lifestyle".

Burnham said: "We are dealing with increasingly sophisticated, organised criminality and we need to ensure that our use of science and technology meets the challenge."

The Home Office Scientific Development Branch (HOSDB) is already working on many of these technologies. The researchers are working on using spectroscopy to probe a saliva sample for any drugs, including illegal drugs, that it might contain.

RFID tagging is already being used to combat counterfeiting, and other tracking technologies are in use to monitor criminals. There is also more to come from automatic tracking and identification from CCTV pictures, the department said.

As well as setting up a team within the Home Office to oversee the implementation of the strategy, Burnham says he hopes to work closely with universities, industry and other government departments both in the UK and abroad.

"We invest nearly £60m each year across a broad range of sciences and on top of our own investment, we are now leading a £14 million cross-Whitehall counter-terrorism research programme to address the knowledge gaps that need to be filled." ®

Read the proposal for yourself here.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Bono apologises for iTunes album dump
Megalomania, generosity and FEAR of irrelevance drove group to Apple deal
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.