Feeds

Reg saves World Summit with multi-million-pound commitment

Not a pointless exercise after all

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Register has put its money where its mouth and saved the World Summit from being branded a waste of everyone's time.

Yes, the United Nations has added our "commitment to provide the peoples of the world with excellent IT news coverage" to its official list of projects achieved under the WSIS process, called the Golden Book.

WSIS screengrab

Reg WSIS screengrab

Far from being an open database, without any checks or balances - which would of course have made the whole thing a nonsense - we are delighted to announce that ITU fact-checkers have pored over our application and decided that The Register's pledge to "put forward significant resources to producing and promoting news on all IT subjects for the perusal and enjoyment on any Internet user in the UK or anywhere in the world" is worthy of entry into the database.

It is a great honour, especially since the head of ITU Yoshio Utsumi himself pointed to the Golden Book as the summation of everything that has been achieved at the Tunis World Summit. The Reg's pledge (no. 3483617) - listed as having been put forward by the UK government, even though we forgot to ask them - now joins the 200 or so other entirely reliable entries in the database and, we are pleased to say, is one of the largest monetary commitments there.

Reviewers of the Golden Book will no doubt be pleased to know under other information that "the site's great", and will be excited to realise that our partners in this enterprise will be "journalists, alcoholics and cuddly animals".

So that settles once and for all the question over what has actually been achieved by this entire summit process. With our commitment coming in between one million and ten million euros, it may just have tipped the balance between the money realised from what the summit purported to promote, and the amount actually spent on hosting it.

You can see the full commitment on the ITU's website here. Why not add your own and help the process along? ®

Related link

Register commitment no. 3483617

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
Inside the EYE of the TORnado: From Navy spooks to Silk Road
It's hard enough to peel the onion, are you hard enough to eat the core?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?