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Infinium CEO quits after 14 weeks

Bachus bails

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Kevin Bachus, the ex-Microsoft Xbox chief who took charge of online games service Infinium Labs in August, has quit the company after barely three months on the job.

Stepping in to fill the now-vacant CEO post is Greg Koler, who was head of Infinium's European operations. Koler is now Interim CEO. He's also the company's CFO and President. He may even be the guy who makes the tea, too.

"The Company plans to enter into a definitive employment agreement with Mr. Koler in the immediate future," the firm's latest filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) notes.

Bachus assumed the hot-seat on 15 August after company founder and CEO Tim Roberts stepped down to become chairman of the board. Bachus originally joined Infinium in January 2004 as President. He resigned both positions, plus that of acting CFO, on 17 November.

Infinium said simply Bachus quit "to pursue other opportunities".

When The Register spoke to him in September, Bachus said his immediate goals were to put the company's "house in order" - to put a more formal corporate structure in place and make the business a more attractive proposition for investors.

It's not clear how successful Bachus' efforts to find funding have been. Certainly, Infinium didn't address that aspect of his role directly today. Koler said that Bacchus' efforts had "helped put our operational planning on track and has helped create awareness for the company in the industry".

Bachus' industry connections may well have encouraged it to consider Infinium and its proposed Phantom games console and broadband content delivery service a more serious player than before. But it remains the case that delays have caused observers to wonder whether the much-hyped system will ever see light of day.

Phantom was first scheduled to ship late 2003, then in November 2004. After that launch was delayed, Infinium stopped mentioning launch schedules in public. All Bachus would say when we asked him was "sooner rather than later". ®

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