Feeds
60%
Evesham Bluemedia BM-6380 GPS navigator

Evesham BlueMedia BM-6380 GPS navigator

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The BM-6380's UK supplier, Evesham, claims the device has "the most up-to-date and accurate maps available". Maybe they are, but that doesn't mean they are actually up to date. I used the unit to take me to visit a chum who moved out to Potton, Befordshire a four years ago. True, he move into a brand new home, on a new street, but while the street's in the BM-6380's list, none of the houses are.

The navigator is also supposed to offer seven-digit postcode searching. Again, maybe it does, but I couldn't get it to recognise any of the codes I entered in the waypoint-setting section. It did work when setting a single destination, however.

On the road, the unit seemed to take longer than other GPS receivers to get a satellite fix. When it did, it put in on a road three streets away from mine. Once in motion, however, it soon figured out where I really was and started giving me appropriate directions - but not before I'd been given a spurious traffic-light camera warning. In fact, the speed camera alert I got not long after the device's map reading and my physical location co-incided was questionable: if there's a camera there, it's unmarked.

Evesham Bluemedia BM-6380 GPS navigator

In other respects, the software works exactly as it should. It will get you from A to B, and back on to the route if you stray from your course. And there's a nice pedestrian mode for walkers. Don't do what I did and let the battery run flat. If you do, you'll have to reinstall all the navigation software, even though it's already installed. On the plus side, it will play any MP3s and show any photos stored on the SD card.

Verdict

The BM-6380 is a competent GPS navigation product. The hardware isn't bad, but I didn't take to the Destinator software - apps like CoPilot Live, Navicore and even Navman's SmartST Pro do it better. These all run on top of Windows Mobile, but the fact that the BM-6380 doesn't have all that PocketPC stuff to handle too didn't make it any faster or, crucially, more responsive - there were plenty of pregnant pauses while the screen changes what it's showing.

Still, you pays your money, you takes your choice. You can't expect the latest GPS technology and the fastest CPU for £300. That's a little cheaper than other low-end dedicated GPS devices, such as the Mio DigiWalker 268 or the Navman iCN520. Like those it does what it's supposed to, and does it reasonably well, though for me the others have controls more suitable for in-car use. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

60%
Evesham Bluemedia BM-6380 GPS navigator

Evesham BlueMedia BM-6380 GPS navigator

GPS-based route-planning rig that does what it says on the tin...
Price: £300 inc. VAT RRP

More from The Register

next story
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
Rosetta science team thinks Philae might come to life in the spring
And disclose the biggest surprise of Comet 67P
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.