Feeds

Penguin gets personal with Linux clusters

Heavy beast slides under your desk

Boost IT visibility and business value

SC05 Penguin Computing has joined the deskside cluster movement with a new box that packs tons of horsepower in a package meant to be convenient for engineers.

The Penguin Portable Cluster stacks numerous blade servers in a vertical, tower-like configuration. Customers can fill the system with anywhere between 6 and 24 low voltage Xeon or Opteron processors – single or dual-core on the AMD front. The system also supports up to 96GB of memory, holds 25 disk drives and has a non-blocking Gigabit Ethernet fabric.

The impressive Scyld cluster management software ships with the system.

The Portable Cluster isn't too different from the deskside cluster sold by Orion Multisystems. It is, however, less of an integrated package as it doesn't have a single "power on" button or tightly-linked internal components. The Penguin system also packs some serious weight. We put our full muscle into lifting the system and could only get it two inches of the desk. Our feebleness aside, you'll need a forklift or California's governor to shove this thing under a desk.

Engineers love these new types of systems as they provide a personal-sized cluster. They can run smaller jobs at their desk or in a lab and transfer work with relative ease to larger clusters designed with similar architectures such as Penguin's Performance Cluster line.

Microsoft chief Bill Gates put his good name behind the personal cluster idea during a keynote earlier this week here at the Supercomputing conference.

You can check out the Penguin system here, and we recommend that you do. It's a cool looking box.

Penguin told us that about 80 per cent of its sales come from Opteron-based systems. "No one is asking for Intel in these types of systems," a rep said. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.