Feeds

GoogleNet conquers Mountain View

One lamp post at a time

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Google's first foray into providing blanket wireless internet coverage has proved victorious, with its home town of Mountain View giving the local company a five-year monopoly on providing Wi-Fi access.

Google will rent 400 street posts in Mountain View, California, for $12,600 a year, on which it will erect 802.11 hubs at a density of around 20 to 30 per square mile. The city wide network is expected to go live in June.

Local residents had raised privacy and health issues, but these were swept aside in a unanimous council vote last night.

"It's a pretty cool thing,'' Mayor Matt Neely told the San Jose Mercury news. Over a fifth of Google's five thousand employees are based in the municipality.

Meanwhile, San Francisco's muncipal Wi-Fi project "TechConnect" which has attracted over 20 bids including one from Google, is under coming under increasing scrutiny, however.

Some of the TechConnect bids remain entirely secret, and in others - for example, Google's bid - 90 per cent of the proposal is redacted.

Kimo Crossman, a Wi-Fi advocate who's been pressing the city for more details, points out that every municipality in the United States is engaging the public in the decision process except San Francisco.

It's a startling departure from the norm for large public infrastructure projects.

He described an August 31 meeting as "... so embarassingly disorganized - seems like they are just going through the motions for cover - that they probably already know about a backroom deal."

He noted that Mountain View's rubber stamping of Google's proposal included no details of a Service Level Agreements, no consideration of impact on other city businesses, large and small, and no details on how the city can cancel and under-performing bid.

Kimo's campaign to ensure San Francisco doesn't suffer the same fate is detailed on his weblog, Webnetic. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS
AppleSIM 'ware to allow quick switch of carriers
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.