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Sun's first Niagara-based server arrives in pictures

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Exclusive Not to obliterate a dead horse, but we've spotted Sun Microsystems' upcoming Sun Fire T2000 server once again – this time on Sun's own site – in pictures.

We're determined to convince Sun that this box exists despite its protestations that it doesn't. A dig on the search engine of your choice will show that Sun is selling four-core, six-core and eight-core versions of the Niagara-based Sun Fire T2000 to the State of Florida. The web site won't be around long, but you can find the cached version here at least until Sun calls its good friends at Google. The highest-end system costs $26,995 with 32GB of memory and 2 73GB drives. A low-end, four-core system costs $8,295 with 8GB of memory and 2 73GB drives. That pricing fits with what we presented earlier this month. Sun, of course, won't officially comment on the pricing because it doesn't want anyone to talk about the Sun Fire T2000 until an official Dec.6 launch event.

Sun isn't doing a very good job of protecting the secret though, as you can see from this page. (Don't expect that site to be around too much longer either.) After a couple of clicks, we were able to find a picture of the T2000 and all of its specs.

Many of you will be familiar with these details since we've been over them in the past. According to Sun's official product brief sheet, the Sun Fire T2000 will ship with a single UltraSPARC T1 chip with 4, 6 or 8 cores. It will have 16 memory slots than can hold 512MB, 1GB and 2GB DDR2 DIMMS. In addition, customers will find four 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports, four hard drive slots, four USB ports, three fans and one blower, three PCI-Express slots, two PCI-X slots, two power supplies, advanced lights out management and cryptography acceleration in hardware. Quite the package.

For some reason, the smaller Sun Fire T1000 has started to disappear from Sun marketing materials. Insiders, however, assure us the system will arrive.

It's hard to imagine Sun still being able to deny the T2000 after all this, but we're sure it will try. ®

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