Feeds

Sony suspends rootkit DRM

No recall

The essential guide to IT transformation

Sony BMG has said it will suspend production of audio 'CDs' that use XCP, the rootkit-style DRM developed by British company First4Internet Ltd. However the music giant refused to apologize for the software, which exposes PCs to malware and which can disable the PC's CD drive when users try to remove the software.

Sony also declined to follow EMI's example in September and recall CDs already in the retail channels.

Around 20 CDs use XCP, which has been on the market since April. (The EFF has a list, here).

But since a security website drew attention to implications of XCP last week, Sony has been deluged with complaints, prompting lawsuits in California and Italy.

"We are aware that a computer virus is circulating that may affect computers with XCP content protection software," Sony said in a statement. "Nonetheless, as a precautionary measure, Sony BMG is temporarily suspending the manufacture of CDs containing XCP technology. We also intend to re-examine all aspects of our content protection initiative to be sure that it continues to meet our goals of security and ease of consumer use."

Sony may rue the wave of consumer outrage, and the subsequent lawsuits. But it may also note that the scandal took more than six months to surface.

And the music publisher isn't exactly rushing to make amends. Sony's unfortunately worded phrase "ease of consumer use" reminds us that while the stealth DRM software installs itself without permission (the click-through statement fails to inform of the user of its true nature), uninstalling it requires the CD buyer to request permission from Sony via a web form. So it's hard to take Sony BMG's assurances seriously.

You can read Sony's statement here. Symantec has posted an advisory and removal tool here. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS
YouGov poll reveals terrible truth about the enemy within
Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group
ALEC will have to do without Redmond, it seems
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?