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Iomega touts anti-shock micro HDD

Credit card-sized

Iomega Mini Micro HDDIomega has brought the "drop-shock technology" increasingly finding a place in notebook hard disk drives to its line of compact external HDDs, the company said yesterday.

The new Micro Mini Hard Drive line comprises a pair of drives, one offering 4GB of storage, the other 8GB. Both connect to a host Windows, Linux or Mac system, using a built-in fold-away USB 2.0 cable through which the drives are also powered.

The drives weigh less than 50g, Iomega said, and measure 7 x 5 x 1.4cm, so they take up less space on your desk than a credit card does. They contain a 4200rpm HDD with 2MB of cache RAM. Iomega bundles back-up tools for both Mac and Windows.

Iomega didn't detail the drives' "drop-shock technology", but claimed it does offer protection from "drops and bumps", though that may be as much down to the alloy casing and its "sleek, durable design".

The 4GB and 8GB Micro Mini Hard Drive are available now to US buyers for $130 and $170, respectively. In the UK, the prices are £87 and £115 - European buyers may also choose a 6GB model, retailing for around £100. ®

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