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Science is all rubbish, let's go live in caves

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Letters The anti-software patent campaigners have long drawn a parallel between patenting software and patenting a story. Their plan was to use the notion as an exaggerated and hypothetical illustration of the nonsense of patenting software. But that hasn't stopped someone actually going out and trying to patent a plotline.

Yes, you read that right. If you missed the original story, click here and see how long it is before you check the calendar to make sure it isn't 1 April:

How about this for a patent:- A process of relaying a story having a timeline and a unique plot involving characters comprises: a son of a carpenter who performs some miracles and is then crucified. (Patent Pending)

Marie


if we're going as base as the 'underlying idea' then shouldn't the tale of rip van winkle be acceptable as evidence of prior art ?

or alternatively captain caveman perhaps.....

Dave


I want to be the first man to take out patent rights AND copyrights on myself!

Yes, you heard me, myself. Obviously, as one of "Gods" children I am as about as unique as any living being can be so I believe I have an answer to Identity Theft that can be easily prosecuted everywhere in the world (except China)

I would need to change US patent law to assure that the patent rights don't expire until I "pass on". Seventeen years isn't going to be enough. With cloning and DNA tests and every other damn government ID and passport looming in the future, what better way to prevent people from bothering you.

I can see it now, the Federal Government, Phone Company, Credit Agencies Etc, would all have to get my express written permission in order to create a list that used my copyrighted name and patented DNA. In fact so would the IRS!

I wonder what they'll do if I refuse them permission!?!

I hope this guy gets a patent on his story line test cuz whether he realizes it or not, that will open a fabulous can of worms and I would love the opportunity to spread them everywhere.

Dan


Not thinking much further into this guy's claims -- although their may be some technical relevance to it -- his idea is structurally very similar to Jennifer Garner's "13 Going on 30", whether he likes it or not. So much for not finding a "prior art" example. "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind".... Not that one may be precedent setting...

At least he gets attention for the attempt, huh?

Karim


So nobody's written a story involving amnesia? I'm sure I read one more than forty years ago (I'd never heard of anyone losing their memory before and accepted it for the story but reserved judgment as to whether it really happened).

John


It is a bad idea, like many other bad ideas that get undue attention today, the author is covered and protected by copyright law as it is and no sane author will defend this because it basically means an end to the freedom of writing. And it is inconceivable that this is what the original creators of copyright law had in mind.

Jorge


ICSTIS, the body that regulates premium phone numbers, has noticed a hefty increase in the number of complaints about dodgy prize scams and other premium rate services, but says rogue dialler issues are down. Not surprising, you say:

You reported ICSTIS as saying: "By Autumn 2005 we had achieved a 99 per cent reduction in the enquiry and complaint levels linked to Internet dialler services. This was achieved through effective crisis management and partnership management with originating networks, Ofcom, DTI, trade bodies and others including the police," it said."

A 99% reduction is pretty impressive, but I suspect that much of that reduction came about because of the large uptake of broadband, not the efforts of ICSTIS. If you no longer have a modem then a rogue modem dialler is impotent. Now if only they could achieve that sort of reduction in the live scams.

Regards

Alan D.


Next, the Hydrino generator. Ultimate future power source or load of old tosh? Well, here are some of your thoughts:

"What on earth is keeping all the electrons in hydrogen atoms and ions sufficiently excited that they stay is their theoretically less stable 'orbit' in the ground state?"

Intelligent Design, of course.. :-)

James


Surely the hydrino is a form of Intelligent Hydrogen.

According to the new scientific paradigm, you only have to believe it to be true (except on April 1th, when it becomes a fact anyway due to intelligent intelligence).

Keep up the good work !

Ronald


And a fan of Blacklight Power, the company backing the research, writes:

If you take the time to actually look and read, Randy answers this question and many other questions in his papers, on his webpage and in the book.

Electrons do prefer a lower energy state (closer to the nucleus). However, if you read the scientific papers, you will see that the odds of *atomic* hydrogen and a catalyst atom randomly colliding in our environment to create a hydrino are very low--hence one reason why we don't see them plentiful in nature on our planet... There are a number of other reasons as well (read for more info).

However Randy postulates hydrinos are the major form of dark matter and also that exothermic hydrino reactions explain the excess, unexplained heat on the sun (beyond what just fusion and other conventional physics calculates out and predicts)... There are many other things Randy's theory does nicely which Quantum mechanics does not -- such as closed form equations to diatomic molecular calculations.

He also has had samples of simple chemical compounds available for chemical characterization by interested labs which repeatedly show a previously unseen and unexplained upfield hydrogen shift in the NMR spectra -- which can be explained with hydrino theory.

Just because you can find a bunch of close minded scientists right now who poo-poo the theory (and haven't given it a serious look, or read) doesn't mean they are right in dismissing the theory. I believe Randy and Blacklight Power has stumbled onto something valid and significant. And until someone puts a better theory forward to explain the data, I'm not about to dismiss it.

Randy derives his results using sound physics and math -- he doesn't hand wave them, contrary to what articles like this imply (at least to the masses). Randy is now exciting a number of classical physicists with the ability to calculate atomic scale phenomena accurately, when previously this was solely the domain of quantum physicists.

Remember, the fathers of QM themselves felt that classical physics would ultimately be able to explain atomic scale phenomena. Randy has apparently acheived this...

Take a look at the classical physics approach of deriving some of the diatomic calculations in his following paper vs. the flawed, problematic, physically inconsistent approach of QM:

http://www.blacklightpower.com/theory/theorypapers/NatureChemicalBondRevisited%20102805.pdf

Thanks,

John


I will now wait to refuel my mini-van until the full scope of this has been assimilated by the energy markets and I can get 39 cent a gallon gas. I am also divesting all my vastly meager wealth into water companies stock.

Adopt an Iceberg!!

Now all we need is to have someone invent the urinary purifier so that we can just plug our members in to the power supply to refuel our electric powered vehicles.

Sorry Ladies - you'll have to pay for the optional female refueling feature.

Butch


A good thought this next one:

As I finished reading your article a weird thought popped into my head. If hydrinos really *do* exist, how do you convert them back to plain old hydrogen atoms?

Truly frightening if this is a one-way process.

Bob


So you put water in, split it into it's components, use a catalyst to make the magical hydrino, and (presumably) combust the hydrogen with oxygen to make water to put back into the machine....

....so with a big enough battery, you could generate enough power from a drop of water to boil an ocean. Right.

Rick

Want to read more letters? Go to page 2...

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