Dutch record companies say no to podcast licence

Only if DRM is in place

Dutch record companies have refused to contribute to a uniform podcasting licence proposed by the Dutch collection organisation for composers, lyricists and music publishers BUMA.

They are only interested if some form of DRM is in place, a spokesman for Dutch Association of Phonogram and Videogram Producers (NVPI) told Dutch news site 3voor12. So podcasters aren't allowed to use recorded music released by NVPI members. That agency represents most of the record companies in the Netherlands and abroad, including local offices of major record labels, such as EMI, Universal and Sony BMG.

This summer, BUMA introduced a provisional licence that would allow podcasters to use officially recorded music in their podcasts. Commercial podcasters would have to pay a minimum of €85 and amateurs €35 per month for an unlimited number of songs on an unlimited number of podcasts. BUMA is one of the first music collecting agencies in Europe to introduce such a licence.

However, BUMA's licence wouldn't cover the performing rights, only copyrights of composers, lyricists and music publishers. BUMA was hoping the record industry would join them for a uniform licence, but the record companies are afraid that they have limited control over the podcasts. Nor are they keen to grant a license for "unlimited use".

Spokesman Wouter Rutten says there is little logic to the proposed license. "We simply don't understand why everyone has to pay the same amount," he said. ®

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