Feeds

Linspire will replace Windows with crippled Linux - cheap

You're in good hands

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

If Microsoft makes good on its self-destructive threat to pull Windows from the South Korean market rather than accede to local demands to un-bundle its proprietary media and IM apps, there's a safe harbour waiting in the form of blanket, country-wide licenses for the OS formerly known as Lindows.

Noting that South Korea blows $100m per year on Microsoft bugware, Linspire honcho Kevin Carmony has made a formal offer to South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun to license every computer in the realm for the bargain price of $5m.

"South Korea could save around a quarter of a billion dollars. More importantly, however, it would break South Korea loose from the monopolistic grasp of Microsoft, which the country currently finds itself under," Carmony explains.

We'll forget that one is more likely to be found in a grasp than under it. We'll forget as well that President Roh has, since assuming office, been chucked from the Blue House by an angry National Assembly, and later returned to it, politically crippled, by an even angrier Constitutional Court, and likely has little time to fret about the software loaded on Korean computers. Ministry of Information and Communication Director Hyung Tae-gun would have been a more realistic and productive target of the letter, but no matter. We're delighted to see former Lindows/Linspire CEO Michael Robertson's variety of strenuous Yankee hucksterism and publicity bird-dogging passing so smoothly to his successor.

But we've got to wonder, where will it end? South Korea's population, just shy of 50 million (48.4m to be more precise), gets Linspire for about $0.10 per head. So Australia gets it for $2m? Ireland for 40k? Liechtenstein for $3k? Support burdens would run Linspire into the ground in a heartbeat, if this were anything approaching a serious offer.

Admittedly, by reporting this blatant publicity stunt, we're fueling it to some extent, and that makes us a tad uncomfortable. But as one clear-thinking Reg hack noted, "Microsoft gets tons of media for doing very mediocre things. I don't see why Linspire can't."

So there it is. And at least Louisiana hasn't been mentioned. Yet. ®

Related stories

Microsoft warns that Korea may have to do without Windows
Judge blasts MS bid to monopolize music devices
Microsoft gets Real for $761m
MS security bundling plan causes waves

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.