Feeds

US researchers tout HIV test-on-a-chip

Very useful in the field

Security for virtualized datacentres

A group of US researchers has developed an HIV test-on-a-chip that will mean doctors working in the field will be able to diagnose the disease in a matter of minutes.

The chip could make it far easier for doctors working in remote regions of sub-Saharan Africa to diagnose patients with HIV and begin to treat them. It could be deployed to that end as early as next year, Wired.com reports.

The sensor system was developed by scientists at the University of Texas and Harvard Medical School, led by Harvard's Dr. Bruce Walker.

The chip is etched with a series of impressions - miniature test tubes - that catch the blood for analysis. Each of the tubes can be thought of as a miniature reaction vessel, which in combination with the analyser, can reveal the components of the blood sample.

The doctor drops a sample of blood on to the plastic biochip and pops the whole thing into the analyser which counts CD4 cells. In test conditions, it can deliver a count in as little as ten minutes, the researchers say.

The CD4 count gives doctors an indication of how far the virus has progressed in a patient. This is vital if the doctor is to recommend appropriate treatment.

Currently, blood samples have to be sent to a lab where they can wait weeks before being processed. Even when the results come through, finding the person who gave the sample can prove tricky, so many people go without the diagnosis and treatment that they need.

Austin biotech startup LabNow has licensed the technology and says clinical trials are to begin shortly in China, Africa and parts of the US. The company adds that if the trials go well, the chip could be deployed in sub-Saharan Africa by the middle of next year. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
MEN: For pity's sake SLEEP with LOTS of WOMEN - and avoid Prostate Cancer
And, um, don't sleep with other men. If that's what worries you
Voyager 1 now EIGHTEEN LIGHT HOURS from home
Almost 20 BEEELION kilometres from Sol
Jim Beam me up, Scotty! WHISKY from SPAAACE returns to Earth
They're insured for $1m, before you thirsty folks make plans
ROGUE SAIL BOAT blocks SPACE STATION PODULE blastoff
Er, we think our ISS launch beats your fishing expedition
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
BAE points electromagnetic projectile at US Army
Railguns for 'Future fighting vehicle'
OK Google, do I have CANCER?
Company talks up pill that would spot developing tumors
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.