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Nokia unveils CDMA phone quartet

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Nokia today launched four handsets designed to operate over CDMA networks. Two of the new mobiles focus on emerging markets, the Finnish giant said.

The "value-priced" Nokia 1255 phone offers productivity tools such as a two-way hands-free speakerphone, voice recorder, 250-contact phonebook and a calendar with an alarm clock. There are two built-in games, 20 ringtones and a selection of user-selectable screen savers. The 1255's battery delivers up to four hours' talk time and runs for up to ten days on standby.

The Nokia 2355 is an ultra-compact, colour screen-equipped clamshell phone. The 128 x 128 pixel 65,536-colour screen, built-in FM radio and the ability to download BREW 1.2 or Java MIDP 1.0 content, such as ringtones, games and screensavers pitches the phone at multimedia-savvy buyers. The "integrated flashlight" will presumably appeal to folk living in the dark.

Featuring a bold colour palette including metallic-finish indigo or cabernet clamshell cases, the Nokia 2855 is Nokia's most affordable Bluetooth-enabled CDMA handset, the company claimed. There's a 128 x 160 pixel 262,000-colour display. The 2855 features an 500-entry phonebook, each entry allowing for five phone numbers, e-mail address, web address and a notes field per entry.

There's an integrated handsfree speakerphone, and the 2855 includes a voice memo recorder. The phone supports MP3 and AAC ringtones.

Nokia's 6165 builds on the 2855's feature set with a one-megapixel camera with flash and infrared communications. Support for location-based services allows the 6165 phone to take advantage of mobile applications that take advantage of positioning information for accessing information on nearby points of interest, directions and more, Nokia said.

Both the 1255 and Nokia 2355 phones are expected to be available during Q1 2006. The 2855 and 6165 should be available during the first half of 2006, Nokia added. Pricing will depend on operators. ®

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