Feeds

Nokia, Moto drive world smart-phone sales

Phones keep Palm, HP above water as PDA sales plunge

Website security in corporate America

Palm's Treo smart phone out-shipped the company's traditional PDA products during Q3, the latest figures from market watcher Canalys reveals.

And in a sign that buyers want phones with PDA functionality, rather than PDAs that can make calls, Nokia and Motorola proved the most successful mobile device players in the calendar quarter.

Palm Treo shipments jumped 71 per cent year on year, the researcher said, but that wasn't enough to counterbalance a big fall in PDA sales, which pulled Palm's overall shipments down two per cent when compared to Q3 2004.

Indeed, across the mobile device industry, handheld shipments plunged 18 per cent year on year, while smart-phone shipments were up a massive 75 per cent in the same timeframe.

There are no prizes for guessing who's the winner here: Nokia, which experienced a 142 per cent gain in smart-phone shipments. In Q3 it shipped a record 7.1m units, Canalys' numbers show, taking its market share to 54.8 per cent, up from 39.7 per cent this time last year.

Number-two place Palm saw its market share almost halve, from 14.5 per cent in Q3 2004 to 8.1 per cent. Palm shipped just under 1.1m units, barely ahead of Research in Motion (RIM), which shipped 977,940 Blackberries during the calendar quarter, enough to give it 7.5 per cent of the market, down from 8.3 per cent despite a 58 per cent increase in unit shipments. However, the outcome of the legal battle with NTP could cost it dear in coming quarters, especially if NTP wins a ban on US Blackberry sales.

Nokia's surge partly explains that paradox - so does fourth-placed Motorola's success: its unit shipments leapt 1025.5 per cent year on year, pushing its market share from less than a single percentage point to 5.3 per cent. The upcoming Treo-like Q device could well drive Motorola to further success.

Certainly, HP's new smart-phone line, the iPaq hw6500 series, helped keep the company in Canalys' list of top five vendors, though its overall unit shipments were down 20.1 per cent, and its market share fell from 9.3 per cent to 4.2 per cent. In Q3 2004 it was the number three vendor - now it's in fifth place. Like Palm, HP has suffered from rapidly declining PDA sales - unlike Palm, it's taken a long time to equip itself with a solid smart-phone product. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.