Feeds

VMware sets partitioning software free . . . as in beer

Look and touch but don't create

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

VMware continues to step up pressure against rivals by maturing its partitioning play at a quick clip. The company this week hit out against Microsoft and Xen by releasing a free tool for running virtual machines on Windows and Linux PCs.

Modeling itself on the likes of Adobe or Macromedia, VMware has put out the VMware Player as a kind of free taste of what its partitioning software can do. The package lets customers run virtual machines created by users of the higher-end Workstation, GSX Server and ESX Server products. As you would expect, VMware Player cannot be used to create a virtual machine and lacks a number of other features found in the for profit products.

While limited, VMware Player does make it possible for a company to pass virtual machines around for testing purposes or to run different OSes within an organization.

"VMware Player is ideal for safely evaluating pre-built application environments, beta software or other software distributed in virtual machines," VMware said. "With VMware Player, anyone can quickly and easily experience the benefits of pre-configured products without any installation or configuration hassles."

VMware, a subsidiary of EMC, enjoys a large lead in the server virtualization market over Microsoft and relative newcomer XenSource. VMware claims thousands of large customers, while its rivals remain tight-lipped about users and struggle to match ESX Server's features. Next year, VMware will release Version 3 of the high-end ESX product.

VMware Player could help the company establish an edge against the competition by tempting new customers with a free tool. It's sort of a middle-of-the-road response to XenSource, which gives away its core partitioning product, hoping to sell ad-ons around it.

You can see a comparison of how VMware Player stacks up against the for profit applications here. There's more information on how to download and use VMware Player here. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.