Feeds

Web 2.0: It's ... like your brain on LSD!

But what is it really?

Top three mobile application threats

Friday Poll There's much fretting about what Web 2.0 really is. It's twice as cosmic, but what is it?

Conference co-organizer Tim O'Reilly's first attempt to explain it spanned five pages, and produced the following. Apparently it's a fridge magnet game, and Business Week, which is positioning itself as the indispensable weekly for the Hive Mind, faithfully reprinted it.

But all we saw was little sighs and coughs trying to be words, words trying to be catchphrases, and phrases trying to be paradigm-shifting, world-changing ideas. It still didn't make much sense.

(And by the way - what's "perpetual beta" doing there? In case you missed that ace new concept, it's just floating around on the center-left, ominously close to the large orange rectangle in the middle. Well, sorry guys. Microsoft beat you to that one a long time ago. We've been waiting for the Longhorn "cured version of Windows" for 73 years now. And a usable desktop version of Linux for almost as long.)

Aware of the confusion, Transcendental Tim returned to the challenge, and rushed off this, which is at least a full sentence:

Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an "architecture of participation," and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.

Author Steven "Emergence" Johnson chipped in with this, another earthy metaphor, that as we noticed, they take to like cats take to catnip:

"The difference between this Web 2.0 model and the previous one is directly equivalent to the difference between a rain forest and a desert."

Which means right now, you're staring at some sand.

"This is good news whether we love poodles or not," he said inexplicably. But Steven wrote a best-selling book called Everything Bad Is Good For You - so maybe that's a bad news. Or is it?

Now social software smoothie Ross Mayfield thinks he's cracked it. In a brilliant blog post, he proclaimed

Web 2.0 is made out of people

That's all I have to say.

He didn't need to say anymore: the cry rang around the blogs. Yes, that's it!

Then we remembered it was the punchline of the movie Soylent Green, where corpses are reconstituted into food. Yeeeuch!

Well, we thought since no one can tell us what it is, except for projecting fantasies of what they think it should be, something must be done, before investors lose their shirts. So we're throwing it open to the "collective intelligence" of El Reg, as no one does funnies next generation global computing architectures quite like you on a Friday.


Web 2.0 is made of ...

 


All you have to do is click on the appropriate link. It contains a Web 1.0 mailto: indicating your preference. Then hit send. Or, you can substitute your own marketing jargon or buzzword, if you're feeling inspired.

The best one gets… oh, something. Good luck. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.