Feeds

Yahoo! targets! Stanford! students!

Have some music - the first hit is free

High performance access to file storage

Geeks and overachievers at the prestigious Stanford University are to be offered access to more than one million online songs hosted by Yahoo! Music. But almost a quarter of the students are excluded, since the service doesn't work on Mac computers.

A year-long pilot program will allow 18,000 graduates and undergrads to play and download music for free, thanks to the support of "a mystery backer," says the University. From October 1, 2006, reduced-rate subscriptions apply.

Stanford is the latest university to phase-in a legal online music service, although university officials have denied this is an attempt to get the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) off of their backs. Others, like Cornell, are going over to Yahoo! Music’s reborn rival Napster - with mixed results.

[See Students refuse to buy a single song from Napster ]

According to the Stanford Report, unnamed representatives of the recording industry have, in the past, "warned some Stanford-network users about their file-sharing activities."

Susan Weinstein, university director of business development, said: "Of course we hope that students will use this robust, easy-to-use alternative to illegal file sharing, but we also think it is just a great service, giving students access to a compelling music experience," Weinstein told the Report.

The university is, like Cornell, taking steps to ensure a fifth of its student population will be excluded from participating in its music service. Yahoo! Music is only available for machines running Windows Microsoft’s 2000 and Windows XP operating systems, not the Mac favored by a hard core of students. According to Stanford, 78 per cent of undergraduates use Windows-based machines.®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours
«Email? Mais non ... il est plus tard que six heures du soir!»
Adrian Mole author Sue Townsend dies at 68
RIP Blighty's best-selling author of the 1980s
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.