Feeds

IBM makes tape disappear with virtual storage magic

More big plans

High performance access to file storage

Quite awhile has passed since IBM first announced its On Demand Computing agenda, and the vendor is still hammering away at the goal. This week, IBM attacked the virtualization portion of its strategy with a slew of storage and server products.

Tape might not be a sexy topic, but IBM is trying to spice the technology up a bit with the release of a new virtual tape product. The Virtualization Engine TS7510 pairs a rack server with a disk system to give users up to 46TB of storage space. Customers can backup data to this storage box in the same format they use for tape but benefit from the quicker backup and recovery times associated with disk.

IBM, however, doesn't appear to have come up with this gem on its own.

“At this point, for a number of confidentiality reasons, we’re not discussing who (the supplier) is,” Charlie Andrews, director of IBM storage told Byte and Switch.

The online rag continued with some good-natured speculation.

"There’s a number of possible contenders. IBM currently has an OEM deal with Network Appliance to sell its storage gear, and NetApp acquired virtual tape library (VTL) startup Alacritus Software Inc. in April for $11 million. NetApp is currently tweaking the Alacritus VTL and is expected to release it under its own brand later this year or early next year.

"An industry source says IBM has also considered reselling startup Sepaton’s VTL technology. Hewlett-Packard Co. also has an OEM deal with Sepaton."

So there you have it. Kind of.

IBM also celebrated the release of Wizard Virtualization Capabilities for its Unix server line. We covered this "wizard-driven, browser-based user interface" wonder during the recent Power5+ launch. It basically makes it easier for administrators to set up micropartitions on the Power-based kit with either AIX or Linux. The tool is free, which is nice.

Along similar lines, IBM put an Oct. 26 delivery date out for Director 5.1 on its blade and x86 servers. Unix, iSeries and mainframe customers can get their hands on the management software in the fourth quarter. Also, at the end of October, IBM plans to release a version of the software that can manage rivals' x86-based servers. This will help in IBM's overall virtualization goals.

Plans, plans, plans

For those of you who like to stay awake at night wondering what IBM might release next, the company tossed out a pair of tidbits.

IBM announced "plans to deliver" Version 3.1 of its SAN Volume Controller software. The new release will support up to 4 times more servers than current code, so you'll obviously be able to manage more gear from different vendors. When will the software arrive? Easy, tiger. IBM's just announcing plans for the moment.

IBM also has plans to put out a new Advanced Cabling Technology (ACT) family of KVM switches.

Happy waiting. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
USA opposes 'Schengen cloud' Eurocentric routing plan
All routes should transit America, apparently
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.