Feeds

Business support for ID cards collapses

One in four like 'em

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Two years ago 73 per cent of company directors were in favour of ID cards but that figure has now fallen sharply despite the London bombings.

Only 45 per cent of company directors now believe the introduction of ID cards would make British cities safer from terrorist attack and just 26 per cent think they would benefit their business. The same number of directors believe the death sentence for terrorist killers would make us safer. The figures come from a quarterly survey from the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Guy Herbert, general secretary of lobby group NO2ID, said: "The more people learn about state ID control the less they like it, and this is as true for businesses as for private individuals.

The Home Office has been trying to flog ID control as a ‘convenience’ to a few of the very largest companies in the hope that this will push the others into line. But once entrepreneurs and managers wake up to the costs, risks and red-tape that a nationalised identity system will add to all employment and commercial relationships, scepticism could turn into fury."

One in four directors have changed how they travel as a result of the London bombings.

The latest survey found business leaders suggesting other policy changes instead of ID cards - 77 per cent believe extended stop-and-search powers would help, 70 per cent support armed police on tubes, trains and buses and 63 per cent support the reintroduction of conductors on buses.

The London Chamber of Commerce and Industry's quarterly Monitor survey talks to a sample of directors at 165 firms in London and the south-east.

More detailshere.

It also emerged yesterday, thanks to a written answer from Baroness Scotland of Asthal, that the government has already spent over £20m on ID cards. The government has paid PA Consulting just over £12m. Atos Origin, which ran the biometric trial, was paid £1,079,262. The Sirius consortium of Fujitsu Services, Global Crossing and PWC got £183, 648. All the contracts are detailed here.®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority
Let’s Encrypt to give HTTPS-everywhere a boost in 2015
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.