Feeds

Google Sun (Office) not a threat, says MS

'Just download the software'

High performance access to file storage

The Microsoft exec in charge of Office has dismissed last week's tie-up between Sun and Google as illusion rather than substance.

"That announcement didn't have anything," Chris Capossela, corporate vice president,Information Worker Product Management Group of Microsoft, told a crowd of Dutch reporters last week.

"It had something about a toolbar and Java Runtime, and it alluded to a potential thing some time in the future. OpenOffice isn’t hard to get, just go to their website and download the software."

"Of course we pay attention to what is going on elsewhere, but there was no substance to that announcement," Capossela said. "It is not that there is a distribution problem with OpenOffice. The product is right there. I didn't see anything that causes any change. Sun makes very expensive proprietary hardware, while Google offers free software for the masses. Is that a marriage made in heaven? I don't know."

Last week it became apparent that Sun and Google are not creating an anti-Microsoft alliance, at least for now. The companies have agreed only to explore opportunities to promote and enhance Sun technologies, like the Java Runtime Environment and the OpenOffice productivity suite. Google co-founder Sergey Brin last week flatly denied that there are plans for a web-based productivity suite under the name Google Office.

Microsoft has no plans for a web-based Office suite either. "We see Office as a front end to business processes," Capossela says. "There is an opportunity to take the unstructured world of MS Office, and the very structured world of ERP and CRM systems and integrate them more deeply. The best example is MS CRM, which we will release shortly as version 3.0. It is build directly into MS Outlook."

He also referred to Office Communicator, an integrated communications client, which even federates AOL, MSN and Yahoo users. "You can turn an instant message into a video conversation, rather than using a separate video application. We also integrate it with your PBX system, and with Exchange and Outlook, so that when you are in a meeting, you can go to voice mail. We do a better job now of integrating these functions."

Capossela added that Microsoft is making an effort to cut down the volume of email people are getting. "People often collaborate through email. They send each other attachments, which is a very inefficient way to work together on projects. We believe that innovations in the new Office 12 - such as Sharepoint and Groove - will ease the pain dramatically. Groove makes it easy to create team spaces, where people can work on projects."

Groove, of course, is the provider of tools for ad-hoc workgroups, which was recently taken over by Microsoft. Founder Ray Ozzie is the man behind Lotus Notes. Is Microsoft perhaps moving away from email and conceptually going back to Lotus Notes? Well, yes and no.

"The thing that Lotus Notes did not well at all was to solve inter-company problems," Capossela says. "With Notes you could easily build applications within the company, but it was extremely hard to expand that out. We now see that people are moving away from Notes, and start using Groove instead.” ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.