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Are you a bored web techie? Join al-Qaeda

Ossie places internet small ad

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You won't find the ads down at your local job centre, but al-Qaeda is recruiting web techies for its fast-growing international internet propaganda operation.

According to Reuters, the fun-loving organisation has published web adverts "asking for supporters to help put together its Web statements and video montages", or more precisely, it has "vacant positions for video production and editing statements, footage and international media coverage about militants in Iraq, the Palestinian territories, Chechnya and other conflict zones where militants are active."

The advert was spotted by London-based Arabic publication Asharq al-Awsat which notes that al-Qaeda-linked web presence the Global Islamic Media Front promises to "follow up with members interested in joining and contact them via email". It does not, though, specify how wannabes should make their applications, nor does it state a salary.

With regard to the latter, Asharq al-Awsat notes: "Every Muslim knows his life is not his, since it belongs to this violated Islamic nation whose blood is being spilt. Nothing should take precedence over this." We take this to mean that successful applicants should not expect a six-figure salary, 28 days paid leave, a company car or health insurance, although you probably get a company AK-47 thrown in as part of the package.

The Global Islamic Media Front has been busy of late in the virtual world - it this week broadcast its second helping of web programme Voice of the Caliphate, which it reckons "aims to combat anti-Qaeda 'lies and propaganda' on major global and Arab television channels". The Front is also behind Jihad Hidden Camera, an English-language net production showing attacks against US forces in Iraq accompanied by comedy sound effects and canned laughter.

All of which should give potential applicants exactly what the job entails. Sounds like a laugh a minute. ®

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