Feeds

All aboard the Enterprise Service Bus

Event processing, anyone?

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Analysis Sonic Software has a good claim to the invention of the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and has done more than anyone else to evangelise the concept, backed by the resources of its parent company, Progress Software.

Sonic runs regular seminars (we attended one, entitled “SOA: Best Practices, an Architect's forum” in London this week); and Enterprise Service Bus by Dave Chappell, Sonic's VP and chief technology evangelist, (O'Reilly, ISBN 0-596-00675-6), is an excellent introduction to ESB.

The ESB concept seems to be maturing now, which means that everybody and his dog is talking ESB – and some of them - Iona's Artix, perhaps - are strong competition for Sonic's own ESB.

An ESB is a “standards-based integration platform that combines messaging, web services, data transformation to reliably connect and coordinate the interaction of significant numbers of diverse applications across extended enterprises with transactional integrity” (from Chappell's book).

It is better than a hub-and-spoke enterpris application integration (EAI) broker because there is no single bottleneck to scalability, but with that specification, appserver vendors such as IBM or BEA shouldn't have much trouble building one.

Starting more or less from scratch like Sonic has advantages (it should be leaner and faster with the latest technology), but re-using legacy technology has its points too (for a start, people are used to it).

Service mentality

So how do you distinguish yourself in this game? Well, by good marketing and by providing more, and more useful, services.

Sonic Software has done both. Its Service-Oriented Architecture SOA Maturity Model (developed in collaboration with AmberPoint and Systinet and due for publication at the end of October 2005) is partly a marketing tool as far as we can see - it exploits the Maturity Model concept associated with CMMI. CMMI deals with process management, not specific technologies, but it still has some practical uses.

You gain little over traditional approaches when you implement SOA at Maturity Level 1 (ML1) to achieve some new business functionality. But you are at the start of a progression towards something better and the SOA Maturity model helps you track your progress. Level 2 is about architected services and starts to bring cost reduction and control; Level 3 is about business and collaborative services and increases the responsiveness of your business process; Level 4 adds service metrics and promises to start delivering business transformation, from reactive to real-time process; and Level 5 adds automatic proactive optimisation of services using these metrics.

The various stages more-or-less correspond to the maturity levels in CMMI – but we suspect that you need to be operating at CMMI ML4 or 5 to really achieve SOA ML 4 or 5 benefits reliably, and installing an ESB is not a short cut to CMMI maturity.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Next page: Split times

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
New Facebook phone app allows you to stalk your mates
Nearby Friends feature goes live in a few weeks
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.