Feeds

HP buys bladeless blade server pioneer RLX

Sue first, acquire later

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Troubled blade server veteran RLX Technologies has been snatched up by HP for an undisclosed sum.

The two companies announced the deal Monday morning, saying HP plans to use RLX's software for Linux blade server management. This deal must be a huge relief for RLX's current management, which has struggled to find a successful niche for the company's gear. HP expects the transaction to close within 30 days.

"With Linux's expansion into blade server environments, customers want tools that deliver simpler and more robust management," said Rick Becker, a vice president and general manager at HP. "Following our recently announced acquisitions of AppIQ and Peregrine Systems, RLX represents another step in HP's expanding enterprise management capabilities to help enterprise and small and medium business customers simplify their IT environments and cut costs."

RLX pioneered the blade server market, offering compact systems well before any of the Tier 1 vendors. In fact, RLX's strategy was so aggressive that Compaq sued the start-up, claiming it had gained access to trade secrets by raiding Compaq's executive staff. The two companies settled this lawsuit in 2001.

After years peddling its blade systems, RLX in 2004 gave up on the hardware business and decided to focus only on selling its highly-regarded management software. At the time, it laid off most of its staff, leaving it with 36 employees.

The shift to software reflected RLX's inability to defeat HP and IBM in the blade server market and its troubles making use of well over $100m in venture funding. RLX tried time and again to develop a niche, focusing at points on high performance computing, government clients and later bio-tech firms. In the end, it couldn't survive, and, as many expected would happen long ago, a big boy bought it out. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.