Feeds

BEA buys into open source tools

A richer, finer blend

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

BEA Systems is buying tools vendor M7 in a deal calculated to expand BEA's popularity among developers by combining support for open and closed source software.

BEA plans to merge its existing WebLogic Workshop Java web services environment with M7's NitroX integrated development environment (IDE) to deliver BEA Workshop for Java IDE, for use across all of BEA's products. That potentially means support for BEA's WebLogic application server, portal and integration software and the AquaLogic service oriented architecture (SOA) family.

The Eclipse-based NitroX combines support for popular open source frameworks - Apache's Struts framework and the Hibernate object/relational and persistence query engine - with Java Server Faces (JSF) and Java Server Pages (JSP). BEA said M7 would become a "key component" to its tools strategy.

The deal, BEA's second acquisition this month, builds out what BEA is calling a "blended" application strategy that combines open source and closed source.

Faced with increasing competition from companies like JBoss and rising popularity of open source frameworks and movements like Eclipse, BEA has been forced to embrace open source in an attempt turn it to the company's advantage.

BEA announced an open source implementation of its Workshop framework called Beehive in 2004, a framework designed to take developers only so far in terms of scalability and security before they had to jump onboard the full BEA framework.

Eschewing full membership of Eclipse at the time, BEA instead proposed an Eclipse project called Pollinate that was designed to support Beehive while also donating Beehive to Apache. Four years after Eclipse was formed, though, BEA finally joined in 2005 and announced plans to ship future versions of Workshop on Eclipse.

Buying M7 means a greater ability for BEA to target developers on diverse development and runtime platforms. Beyond BEA's own WebSphere, M7's modules support JBoss, Resin, Tomcat, IBM's WebSphere, Mortbay Jetty, Linux and Windows.

On paper, BEA is well placed to pick up developers targeting these platforms simply by owning M7. Experience has shown, though, BEA has lacked the ability to win over developers in large numbers - the inability meet its own target of recruiting one million developers to Workshop in a single year is now legendary. Furthermore, BEA actually risks losing existing M7 users should the integration with Workshop be handled badly.®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Whistling Google: PLEASE! Brussels can only hurt Europe, not us
And Commish is VERY pro-Google. Why should we worry?
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.