Feeds

Tunis World Summit ‘in great danger’

PrepCom president urges world’s governments to pull fingers out

High performance access to file storage

Check out Kieren's radio report on Prepcom 3

The first ever World Summit on the Internet is "in great danger", according to the president of its preparatory committees, unless governments pull out all stops in the next two days.

Janis Karklins, who is also Latvia’s ambassador to the United Nations, convened a special meeting of world governments in Geneva at 3pm today to deliver the blunt message.

"There is progress, but it is slow," he warned. "We have only two-and-a-half working days left but so far we have negotiated only 15 to 20 per cent of the overall text." The conference at the Palais des Nations has been running for nearly eight days now and has been bogged down by lengthy negotiation.

Karklins squashed rumours that there may be a fourth conference just prior to the World Summit in November, stating: "The rumours of a possible new PrepCom are simply false; there will not be any more apart from this one."

That much was confirmed by the Tunisian Ambassador, whose country is hosting the summit. He explained simply: "Tunisia is not willing to host or organise any other PrepComs."

With the ball now squarely in the government’s court, Karklins urged delegates to use "all your skills and knowledge to search for compromise and solutions". "The art of diplomacy," he went on, "lies not only in the ability to defend national positions but in defending national positions to find solution and compromise."

The pace of work, he said, would have to dramatically increase and the ongoing semantic arguments over which precise word is better than another end immediately.

This view was supported by Tunisia, Bangladesh, Russia and Switzerland - with the Swiss urging people not to reopen previously agreed texts. And with the president again urging all those in the room to consider the very tight timeframe for agreement, the special meetings was ended.

Whether it has the desired impact should be seen tonight when freshly negotiated text is released for three hours of further discussion at 6pm tonight. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.