Feeds

RIM picks Intel for next-gen Blackberry

Hermon to bring 3G, EGDE, Wi-Fi to email devices

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Research in Motion's future Blackberries will be based on Intel processors, the push email company said yesterday.

It will be using the chip giant's XScale PXA9xx mobile phone processor, the successor to its current PXA800 "cellular processor" family.

Codenamed 'Hermon', the new chip will add EDGE technology to boost the data transmission rate beyond that provided by the current generation of the chip.

Hermon was formally unveiled at Intel's Spring Developer Forum in March this year. Then, it was scheduled to ship toward the end of the year.

It is also expected to support video conferencing, which suggests 3G support. Indeed, at the Summer IDF, the part was described by Intel Mobility chief Sean Maloney as "our base-band UMTS chipset", so clearly the family will provide more connectivity than GSM/GPRS/EDGE. Past reports suggest it will also incorporate Wi-Fi support.

RIM and Intel were expected to make the announcement at IDF last month. It was claimed RIM would back Intel's WiMAX push, but there was no mention of that yesterday.

But it provides a clue why RIM may have selected the part. Ironically, while it may have its eye on Hermon's faster networking capabilities, all that increased bandwidth will, in part, reduce the need for RIM's email solution. When bandwidth becomes less constrained than is the case with GPRS, the need to store and forward messages becomes less necessary - devices can simply poll servers regularly and download messages at that time.

Of course, per-byte network tariffs may necessitate push's traffic reducing approach for a little while yet - the less data you send, the less you pay - but unlimited data tariffs are already becoming more commonplace.

That leaves RIM's business focusing even less on software than it is today - two-thirds of its revenue comes from hardware - and competing even more aggressively with the Nokias, Palms and HTCs of this world. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS
AppleSIM 'ware to allow quick switch of carriers
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.