Feeds

Bogus FIFA lottery scam hits the net

Offside

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

Fraudsters have launched a phishing campaign thattries to dupe football fans into believing they've won a FIFA-sponsored lottery in an attempt to steal bank account information.

The bogus email notifications of supposed $1m winnings prey on interest in the Football World Cup tournament, scheduled to take place for the first time in South Africa in 2010. FIFA, the international football governing body, has posted a warning on its website.

The latest spam attacks represent a phishing refinement on standard lottery scams themed around the 2010 World Cup dating back over a year or more. "Everyone should be suspicious if they are unexpectedly told they have won a fortune," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos. "Computer users who fall for this trick will be feeling as sick as a parrot when their bank accounts are emptied and they find they have become the victim of identity fraudsters."

World Cup fever has captured the imagination of VXers as well as fraudsters. In May, virus writers released a version of the Sober email worm that ensnared victims by posing as an email from the World Cup 2006 organising committee. Like previous variants, Sober-P was Windows specific and spread as an infected ZIP attachment to messages written in either German or English.

Infected emails pose as ticket confirmation messages from organisers of the football World Cup, due to be held in Germany next year. The worm composes messages with subject lines such as "WM-Ticket-Auslosung" and "Your Password" with attachments such as Fifa_Info-Text.zip containing a .pif payload file. Days after the release of Sober-P, hackers to turn infected machines into relay stations for nationalist spam causing a considerable nuisance in the process. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.