Feeds

Intel and Dell update server gear with promises and rhetoric bump

Single-core brotherhood still looking ahead

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Intel and Dell - aka the Brotherhood of Single-Core Chips - continue to flail about, issuing statements that promise they will eventually ship systems with dual-core server processors. The statements appear to be InDell's best attempt at calming customers' nerves, while competitors and their customers turn to rival gear based on AMD's dual-core Opteron processor.

Intel today, for example, put out a press release talking up a new, speedier Xeon chip and a number of low voltage Xeons. Covering the facts first, the new 64-bit Xeon runs at 3.80GHz (up from 3.60GHz) with 2MB of L2 cache and will slip into current servers. In addition, customers will now find the Xeon LV 3 GHz1 that eats up a max of 55W and the Xeon MV 3.20GHz that consumes up to 90W. Intel was particularly proud of these lower voltage parts and dedicated an entire paragraph in its statement to the processors.

Typically, new processors would warrant far more than just one paragraph in Intel's marketing material. But in these case, the chip giant wants you looking forward to its dual-core chips and not backward at its single-core shame.

These new chips are the last single-core Xeons Intel plans to ship - ever. For that reason, it spent much more time hawking the dual-core Xeon chips that it doesn't even sell yet. Think future, friends.

"In the coming weeks, Intel will introduce its first dual-core Intel Xeon processor, codenamed 'Paxville,'" Intel said.

Quick! Explain how you're not behind AMD as much as you were.

"Originally scheduled in 2006, Paxville will deliver improved performance for both dual-processor (DP) and multi-processor (MP)-based servers," Intel continued.

Phew.

The company then went on to tout the dual-core "Dempsey" chip coming in 2006 for servers and workstations.

Dell today also patted itself on the back for not selling servers with dual-core Xeons yet, although the hardware maker didn't phrase its plans in quite that way.

"Dell has added multi-core technology to its portfolio of award-winning dual-socket servers and workstations, delivering up to 52 percent greater performance while maintaining a common system image for both single- and multi-core systems. The updated servers and workstations also provide the investment protection and flexibility of the industry's most widely used and scalable architecture."

But by "added" and "updated" Dell really meant "conceptualized."

The PowerEdge 1850, 1855, 2800 and 2850 systems that will run on the dual-core Paxville version of Xeon won't actually ship until next month. Customers, however, do have the opportunity of ordering the systems now, if they'll sign an NDA. It's not the most romantic counter to buying a dual-core Opteron-based server, but it will have to do.

Dell also plans to ship its Precision 470 and 670 workstations with dual-core Xeons.

"Dual-core technology combines two processing units into a single processor chip," Dell reminds us in its press release. "The result can be dramatic increases in performance and power efficiency compared to single-core processors, especially when running multiple applications."

That's something rivals IBM, HP and Sun Microsystems have been pointing out for months with their Opteron gear. For some reason, first-to-market king Dell didn't mind being last-to-market on the dual-core server chip front.

In return for its Intel loyalty, Dell apparently received permission to issue its Paxville-based server press release ahead of IBM and HP. Intel typically has all the OEMs put out statements on the same day, hoping to prove the health of its ecosystem and keep everyone happy.

Was shunning AMD worth such a feeble press release - not to mention lost sales? Dell seems to think so. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.