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Predict next terror attack, win t-shirt

Bombs earn prizes at 'sick' website

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UK tabloid the Sun is in danger of succumbing to rage-inspired spontaneous combustion after discovering a website inviting punters to gamble on where the next terrorist attack will occur - and win a t-shirt saying "I Predicted It" if they're right.

Yup, cue outrage in the form of Where-next.com - an interactive "game" where you stick an icon on a world map representing how you think the next strike will be perpetrated (suicide bomber, car bomb, etc, etc). Here's the blurb from creators Molleindustria:

Where-next.com is an exciting gambling game. The most accurate prediction on where terrorists will attack next, wins. The definition of terrorist attack stands here for a war action aimed at any civil target on any location that’s not already involved in any kind of "official" war or so intetend by U.S. administration. Thus comnsider a peaceful territory where there could be at least 10 random civil victims within 48hrs (missing people will not be included).

The person guessing the right technique used (a bomb attack, a suicide bomber, chemical weapons, etc.) and getting the closest location of the attack, will be contacted by e-mail and will receive the exclusive where-next.com T-shirt, showing the place and the time of the attack. A new game will start after every successful attack and the previous bets will be cancelled.

Yawn. There are two problems here: one, that this amateurish effort lacks any sort of redeeming humour which might mitigate against its pointless lack of taste; two, they're flogging skyscraper advertising space on eBay, so it's actually nothing more than a cheap and nasty attempt to pocket some cash in the style of Keith E. Fieler and his feeble "Mind the Bombs".

For its part, the Sun has branded the whole thing "sick" and quotes a Red Cross spokesman as saying: "Whilst the promoters of this site may intend it to be humorous it is, in fact, deeply distasteful. We know from our work to support people affected by the terror attacks in London that many have been deeply traumatised by their experiences. They may well find this site appalling and unhelpful." ®

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