Feeds

Intel Celeron to gain improved AMD64 compatibility

A lot less lead in its pencil, too

Intel's desktop Celeron D chips are to be the latest processors to get the chip giant's NetBurst core update, The Register has learned.

According to Intel documentation, Celeron model numbers 326, 331, 336, 341, 346 and 351 will switch from today's E-0 core to the updated G-1 core on 2 December.

The G-1 core stepping will not only be compliant with European Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) regulations, courtesy of a "lead-free second level interconnect", but add two new instructions to Intel's AMD64-like EM64T 64-bit addressing system.

Intel is adding the LAHF and SAHF AMD64 instructions to its own 64-bit instruction set architecture. It has been alleged that they were missing from the original EM64T specification because the AMD documents used by Intel's engineers pre-dated AMD's addition of the two mnemonics.

LAHF and SAHF two instructions copy content back and forth between a 64-bit x86 processor's status flags and its AH register.

Intel has already told customers it is adding LAHF and SAHF to certain Pentium 4 and Xeon DP processors. The P4s arrive on 14 November, the Xeons on 28 November.

The new-core chips are pin-compatible with old-core Celeron Ds, Intel said, but the new processors will require host systems to have their BIOS code updated. ®

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.