Feeds

CPUs smarter than 'every human brain combined' by 2060

Bell labs chief also punts smell-o-phones

High performance access to file storage

Computers will be able to out-think the entire world population put together within the next 60 years, the head of Lucent's research division has forecast.

First, though, phones will be able to tell how their owners smell, Jeong Kim, Bell Labs' president told reporters in Seoul yesterday.

Kim's comments, conveyed by local paper Joong Ang Daily, make scary reading.

Smell-o-vision phones will come in five to ten years, Kim believes, sampling the odour of the caller and transmitting it to the recipient via the airwaves and an odour-releasing device on the handset. In the same timeframe, handsets will be able to scan for changes in a caller's facial expression.

We're not sure why you'd want that: surely by 2015 we'll all be using videophones, so we'll be able to see the caller's expression. Or maybe by then we'll be dialling numbers that way, using nods and winks to signal numbers and letters. Given the differences between cultures around the world, such a system would make cheap grey imports far too embarrassing to use.

He also said phones will eventually respond to mental commands.

Making all this possible will be what Kim refers to as "nanotechnology", on the subject of which he makes his most startling prediction:

"If nanotechnology maintains its current pace of development, it will give birth to a computer that has the information processing capacity equivalent to every human brain combined by 2060."

If Kim is correct, computers will clearly be smart enough to know you want to make a call before you yourself do. If they're that clever, they'll be able to work out the answer before the call's recipient can. Pretty soon they'll realise there's no need to bother with the human element in the first place - particularly if they detect one or both of the participants hasn't taken a shower recently and all they do is wink at each other... ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.