Feeds

Eolas cashes in on Katrina

Make a difference! Buy our stuff!

Security for virtualized datacentres

Eolas, the one-man software outfit which took Microsoft to the cleaners in a patent dispute, has given its new software launch a topical spin.

In a press release entitled 'Eolas Releases Multimedia Application to Support Hurricane Relief' we learn that Eolas CEO Michael Doyle is introducing what's billed as Muze version 1.0 'Hurricane Relief Edition'.

Software that rescues stranded storm victims while it mops streets while it sweeps as it dusts? Not quite.

Muze is a simple multimedia doodling application that looks like one of the demos intended to show off the capabilities of Apple's Hypercard, circa 1986. Eolas prices it at $39.95, and says it will donate 60 per cent of the revenues it receives to a hurricane relief charity.

But it's a line in the press release that caught our eye.

"Regarding Eolas' commitment to donate most of the revenues from its new product to hurricane relief, Doyle said, 'Eolas is not a wealthy company, but sometimes events happen that make you put things into proper perspective…"

Eolas won $534 million in damages from Microsoft for its patent covering web plugins, a move that prompted calls for fundamental changes in the US patent system. The decision is being appealed.

" … Hurricane Katrina did that for us. We knew we had to try to help in some way, and we decided that doing what we do best, making new kinds of software, would be the most effective way we could contribute to the effort."

"Eolas asks everyone to join them in supporting efforts to relieve the pain and suffering of the victims of this terrible disaster. Anyone who would like to purchase one or more copies of the Hurricane Relief Edition of Muze should visit http://www.mymuze.com"

Words fail.

It isn't the worst example of bad taste chasing a national tragedy, however. On September 11, 2001 a Cisco salesman described the day's terror attacks as a "a good opportunity to sell kit". And a UK cabinet minister with some indifferent figures to publish saw it as "an opportunity to bury the bad news". She subsequently lost her job. ®

Related link

Eolas Hurricane Edition release

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
SLOSH! Cops dethrone suspect - by tipping over portaloo with him inside
Talk about raising a stink and soiling your career
Ingredient found in TASTY BEER is GOOD for your BRAIN
You only have to drink 2k litres a day to see the effect...
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.