Feeds

Suspected volcano forming in Oregon

Geological acne

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A new volcano might be forming in Oregon, according to reports. The US Geological Survey (USGS) says that a bulge in the Earth's crust, covering an area of around 100 square miles, seems to be getting bigger, suggesting that a large quantity of magma is on the move.

The bulge is in the vicinity of the Three Sisters, three now inactive volcanoes in the Oregon Cascade mountain range.

In March last year, the region saw a so-called seismic swarm - a series of around 350 small earthquakes, centred on the bulge itself about three miles away from the South Sister.

The activity and uplift of the ground in the area suggest an underground lake of molten rock around a mile across and 65 feet deep, according to the USGS.

The bulge was first spotted from space, and since 1997 has been swelling upwards at a rate of around an inch-and-a-half every year.

Speculation is also mounting as to the possible outcome. The bulge could be a prelude to the creation of a fourth sister, the geologists say, but it could lead to nothing more exciting than a rather drab pooling of liquid rock.

Even if anything as dramatic as a new volcano forming actually happens, the USGS says the risk to populated centres is small.

Bootnote

Although the Three Sisters peaks are near a town called Redmond, it is not the same Redmond as the one threatened by the simmering volcano that is Steve Ballmer. Imagine the pressure building up as he conducts exit interview after exit interview with almost-ex-employees heading for greener grass at Google.

We can only hope that the volcano and the CEO don't blow their tops at the same time. The resulting combined shockwave could well cause the atmosphere itself to burn, turning the air NT blue, and dooming all of mankind...[That's enough now - Ed]. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies
Gummy pterosaurs outlived toothy competitors
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race
ELMOFO rakes in two wins in sanctioned race
Astronomers scramble for obs on new comet
Amateur gets fifth confirmed discovery
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.