Feeds

EU commissioner outlines e-inclusion plans

Zimmer frames for all

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The European Information Society Commissioner has outlined plans for three new major initiatives to accelerate a Europe-wide e-inclusion drive.

Addressing the i2010 conference in London,Viviane Reding said the "flagship" projects would give "critical mass to our work in three and important and visible areas where ICT has a positive impact on citizens".

Reding was setting out to government and business leaders the central pillars of the Commission's new i2010 strategy, its ambitious five-year information society programme for growth and employment.

The first flagship, she said, aimed to enable Europe's aging population to grow older with independence and dignity. It will build upon research initiatives on e-health, e-accessibility and assistive living, as well as inform future work priorities.

The second will look at using technologies to develop safer, smarter and cleaner cars.

'Digital libraries' will be the third flagship, drawing together work to bring European culture online.

"My hope", said Reding, "is to make Europe’s rich literary and audiovisual heritage available to all and to give a spur to enterprises that can create value by reusing these vast resources."

Her immediate priority for the i2010 programme is to create the regulatory framework for a common 'European information space' which will stimulate the availability of online content.

In her keynote address, the commissioner said EU member states faced "major challenges" to make i2010 a reality and needed to work together on this shared agenda.

DTI minister Alun Michael warned delegates that Europe could not afford to be complacent about its future in the global knowledge economy.

"The i2010 Strategy is our blueprint to make Europe the most competitive and knowledge-based economy in the world by 2010", he said.

"We need to ensure that the i2010 Strategy truly delivers the economic and social benefits of the digital revolution for the citizens of Europe in the 21st Century.

"Achieving this is not just for the Commission or for governments. It is up to all of us in Europe to take the i2010 Strategy forward."

The UK Government hosted the conference as one of the official events of its current EU Presidency. Another event will be held in London next month focusing on e-accessibility issues, followed by a Ministerial e-Government conference in November.

eGov monitor Weekly is a free e-newsletter covering developments in UK eGovernment and public sector IT over the last seven days. To register go here.

Related links

Transcript of Commissioner Reding's keynote speech
About the i2010 conference

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?