Feeds

Ireland unveils supercomputing centre

High end on the South Side

Boost IT visibility and business value

A new 'supercomputing' centre aims to address the growing need among Ireland's researchers for computational resources The Irish Centre for High End Computing (ICHEC), which will be based in Dublin, is set to begin operations on 1 September, thanks to a €2.6m Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) grant.

The centre also received a €0.7 million equipment loan from the HEA PRTLI-funded CosmoGrid programme and an equipment loan of €1.2 million from Trinity College Dublin's HEA PRTLI-funded IITAC programme.

Eight third level educational institutions are involved in the centre - NUI Galway, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS), UCD, UCC, NUI Maynooth, Dublin City University and the Tyndall Institute.

High End Computing, also known as "supercomputing," uses the most advanced aspects of modern computer science to produce supercomputers capable of many trillions of calculations per second. Supercomputers are typically used for calculation-intensive tasks such as climate research, molecular modelling, physical simulations and cryptanalysis.

The ICHEC will help Irish researchers in their work in disciplines such as medical device simulation, marine modelling, bio-informatics, drug discovery, astrophysics and computational chemistry.

"This centre will transform computational science in Ireland, creating facilities which will be on a par with those in the rest of Europe," said Dr Andrew Shearer of NUI Galway's Department of Information Technology and the Director of ICHEC. "Computational science is one of the few areas where Ireland can contribute to 'big' science projects.

Previously Ireland's lack of supercomputing facilities meant that the country was overlooked for international science projects, according to Dr Shearer, who said that the ICHEC will help Ireland to be more competitive and continue to attract high-tech industries to the country.

As well as benefiting Irish researchers and the economy, ICHEC is expected to become a major powerhouse in the knowledge economy, benefiting universities, SMEs - through its technology transfer work - and multinationals.

In addition the centre will have an industrial outreach programme to work with researchers in industries that would typically not have an interest in supercomputing. Furthermore, another programme will be developed to encourage second level students to become more interested in computer science. The ultimate aim of the centre is to make Ireland a leader in supercomputing on a per capita basis by 2010.

Copyright © 2005, ENN

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests
Big Blue finds containers are speedy, but may not have much room to improve
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Gartner's Special Report: Should you believe the hype?
Enough hot air to carry a balloon to the Moon
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.