Feeds

Apple books Freescale

Wins commitment to supply, not necessarily to buy

Apple has contracted chip maker Freescale to supply it with microprocessors through to the end of 2008.

Freescale - the spun-off Motorola chip division - already provides Apple with G4-class PowerPC chips for the Mac Mini, eMac, iBook and PowerBook lines.

Apple, of course, has already signalled its intention to migrate to x86 processors, but it's going to be shipping PowerPC-based systems through 2005 at the very least, and possibly well into 2006.

Some observers have suggested the deal with Freescale, revealed in a document Apple this week filed with with US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), suggests a longer transition time than previously expected, but it's telling that while Freescale is committed to providing Apple with processors, the Mac maker is not committed to ordering any. In short, it's about guaranteeing supply through an inevitably confusing transition period.

Apple currently uses Freescale's MPC7447A chip, but is expected to upgrade to the 7448, a 90nm version of the older part supporting higher bus and core clock frequencies - up to 1.7GHz, in point of fact - and providing double the L2 cache of the earlier chip: 1MB in total. ®

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?