Feeds

W3C tells US Copyright Office: IE is not the only fruit

Browser plans under fire

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The US Copyright Office wants to limit the number of browsers that can submit online forms to its site. The agency has proposed that, temporarily at least, it will accept copyright claims via forms submitted from only Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape browsers.

Perhaps it is just feeling very retro, but whatever the reason, the W3C is not impressed, according to a report from InfoWorld.

In a letter to the Copyright Office, Tim Berners-Lee and Daniel Weitzner, W3C director and W3C technology and society domain leader respectively, wrote: "The proposed system would be contrary to at least the spirit of federal information policy adopted by the E-Government Act of 2002."

The office says that it does intend to be compatible with a wider variety of browsers, such as Mozilla, Firefox and Safari. It said that it is developing its systems using off-the-shelf Siebel Systems software which has only been tested with IE and Netscape.

Julia Huff, the Copyright Office's COO said that the agency was under tight time constraints as it is obliged to have a pre-registration system up and running by 24 October. "It [our system] may work well with other browsers, but they haven't tested those yet with the version of the Siebel software we're using right now."

She went on to say that the agency plans to upgrade next year, to a version of the Siebel software that does support other browsers.

Meanwhile, Berners-Lee and friends, called for a vendor neutral approach from the agency, and warned that single browser compatibility would restrict access to the agency's services. Many MacOS, Linux and Unix users wouldn't be able to access the service, and disabled users could also have difficulties, Berners-Lee said. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.