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Pentium 4 VT plans confirmed by Intel

Desktops get it ahead of Itanium, Xeon

IDF Intel has confirmed a report that the Pentium 4 660 and 670 will be updated soon to incorporate Virtualisation Technology.

However, 'Paxville', the 90nm dual-core Xeon MP part whose release was recently brought forward, will not contain VT, it has emerged.

According to a presentation made yesterday by Intel Digital Enterprise Group chief Pat Gelsinger, VT will appear on the P4 66x and 67x processors in H2 2005.

The 660 and 670 are currently the top two P4s, clocked at 3.6 and 3.8GHz, respectively, so it's reasonably to expect VT-enabled versions to ship with a higher model number, to indicate the presence of this extra feature. As we've said before, our money's on 662 and 672.

Gelsinger didn't provide a precise timeframe for the VT-enabled desktop chips' release, but it will happen before VT Itanium 2 parts ship toward the end of the year. Past reports have claimed that both will ship in Q4.

Paxville MP will ship early Q4, said Gelsinger, with the new, DP-oriented version appearing later in the quarter, he added. But he also said the Xeon MP line will not get VT until H1 2006, presumably when 'Tulsa', the 65nm version of Paxville, ships. ®

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