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Nintendo's Game Boy Micro to arrive early November

US debut in September

Nintendo's Game Boy Micro will ship in Europe on 4 November, the video-game pioneer has revealed.

The European launch will come less than two months after the handheld's US debut, on 19 September.

But while Nintendo has yet to announce a US price, it did say the Micro will cost £69 in the UK. The device is expected to be priced at $99 in the US.

The Micro is essentially the old Game Boy Advance SP done up in a new, slimline package. The machine weighs 79g and measures 10 x 5 x 1.8cm. It sports a 2in backlit LCD.

Nintendo also said it would cut the price of its more sophisticated handheld console, the DS, in the US on 21 August, knocking $20 off the $150 asking price. The cut will be accompanied by the arrival of Nintendogs, the company's virtual pet program, which has proved particularly popular in Japan. For gamers wanting something a little harder, Nintendo will also release Advance Wars: Dual Strike.

Both titles are expected to ship in Europe in September, though Nintendo has not indicated whether they will likewise be accompanied by a DS price cut. However, with Sony's PlayStation Portable due to launch here on 1 September, Nintendo could use a reduction in price as a spoiler. ®

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