Feeds

Microsoft switches on to LAMP

More secure than open source?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Microsoft is positioning planned "express" editions of its next developer tools suite and database as "lightweight" alternatives to the open source LAMP stack.

Martin Taylor, Microsoft's platform strategy general manager, told The Register SQL Server 2005 Express would allow tables and files to be stored on a web page to increase a site's functionality while simplified programming would be provided in Visual Studio 2005.

"We will have LAMP-like capability to quickly build a web site," Taylor claimed. Visual Studio 2005 and SQL Server 2005 are now due to launch on November 7.

LAMP, or Linux, Apache, MySQL and Perl/Python/PHP, is the operating system, web server, database and scripting language stack being talked about and picked-up by start-ups interested in building services on top of open source.

LAMP provides a viable stack for a growing number of small, medium and large business software projects, while SpikeSource and SourceLabs are building services that test and certify the modular components of the LAMP stack.

For Taylor, though, that modularity is LAMP's weakness compared to Microsoft's planned offerings. "That's one of the inherent challenges of open source - it's modular by design. It's not build by design, so that has challenges around it," Taylor said.

Taylor singled-out support for development using Secure Sockets as one area where LAMP tools and runtimes are weak and that Microsoft had solved.

Microsoft, Taylor said, "understood the web by default", and the new database and tools would help reduce the number of lines of code needed to develop web sites while also allowing developers to test lines of code without booting-up a browser.

Microsoft also plans to challenge LAMP on price, with Taylor claiming the tools would be "free of damn near free."

Microsoft in March said it planned to charge $49 for copies of Visual Studio 2005 Express, adding, though, it may give the products away as part of a promotional offer. Visual Studio 2005 Express is currently available in Beta with versions for web, Windows, C#, C++, J++ and SQL Server developers. SQL Server Express, meanwhile, will be available for free and run on a machine with a single CPU and feature report and control wizards.

Separately, Microsoft has rejected calls from Visual Studio 2005 testers for a third Beta of the integrated development environment (IDE) amid claims that solutions to bugs and performance issues are postponed to hit November's delivery. A posting on the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) said a third Beta should be released next month, followed by release to manufacturing (RTM) in 2006.

In a response on MSDN, though, Microsoft said it was working hard to get rid of bugs and was confident it could deliver a "high-quality product" later this year.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.