Feeds

JBoss welcomes BEA immigrants

Migrate here

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

JBoss has re-packaged its middleware migration services to encourage customers to dump incumbent application servers from rivals like BEA Systems.

JBoss said Tuesday it is providing a set of standardized methodologies for customers to create a migration roadmap along with standardized migration tools and training materials for administrators and developers to use during migration.

The open source middleware specialist said it had wrapped up a set of existing, informal migration services, spanning the last two and a half years, into the JBoss Migration Assessment.

According to JBoss, a survey of 3,061 customers conducted last month found 41.4% had migrated from a commercial application server with 22.9% of that group moving five or more applications to JBoss. "The majority of respondents also acknowledged a desire for enhanced services, toolkits and assessment engagements to aid in the migration process," JBoss said in a statement.

JBoss is clearly hoping to use the migration assessment to further weaken rival BEA's business. JBoss quoted BEA customer CitiStreet who it said had adopted JBoss because licensing and support for BEA's WebLogic had proved too expensive.

JBoss' announcement couldn't have been more poignantly timed. BEA is due to report its second quarter fiscal results on Wednesday and BEA watchers will be looking for signs of license revenue growth following a successive five-quarter decline.

While the impact JBoss has had on WebLogic's business is debatable, evidence suggests that at least some BEA customers are buying JBoss for new projects, rather than extending BEA licenses or completely replacing BEA for JBoss.

To help tip customers further away from BEA, JBoss said it will look for the most "cost-effective and efficient" migration process to help organizations. The company said it is working with JBoss-certified systems integration (SI), who include Capgemini, Hewlett Packard and Unisys, to provide the migration services.

The program comes as JBoss itself faces increased competition. IBM last week said it would make the Gluecode open source application server, which it purchased in May, available to those who'd previously been unable to afford, or who hadn't wanted the full features of, its WebSphere application server.

Specifics of the IBM/Gluecode offering are yet to be known, but the thinking is IBM purchased Gluecode to prevent JBoss from building a solid market share in open source application servers, leaving IBM to catch-up as it did against BEA in Java. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.