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Nvidia preps 'C51 Intel Edition'

AMD version due 20 September, say moles

Nvidia is preparing an Intel-oriented version of its first integrated chipset, 'C51'.

Meanwhile, that part, which targets AMD-based systems, will launch on 20 September.

So claim unnamed motherboard makers cited by DigiTimes.

The Intel version of C51 is codenamed 'C60', the sources claim, but were apparently unable to suggest when Nvidia plans to launch the part.

C51 has been said to support both Socket 754 and Socket 939 processors. It will provide GeForce 6-class graphics. All C51 chipsets will support Serial ATA 2, Gigabit Ethernet, Firewire and USB 2.0, and it's reasonable to assume so will C60.

The 20 September release date is slightly later than the mid-Q3 launch window previously suggested.

Last week, Nvidia said its nForce chipsets yielded a 128 per cent jump in revenue between Q2 FY2006, ended 31 July 2005, and Q2 FY2005.

For the quarter, Nvidia realised revenues of $574.8m, up 26 per cent on the year ago quarter's $456.1m, but down 1.5 per cent on the previous quarter. Net income jumped 16.1 per cent sequentially and almost fifteenfold year on year to $74.8m (41 cents a share). ®

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