Feeds

NY radio station fined $240k for female 'Smackfest'

Slaps win prizes

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

NY radio station WQHT Hot 97 has been fined a whopping $240,000 (£134,480) for running an on-air contest where young women were encouraged to slap each other silly to win cash and other prizes.

The "Smackfest" entertainment initiative - which ran from April 2004 to January 2005, attracted the attention of Attorney General Eliot Spitzer and the Athletic Commission because of a "a potential violation of state law on promotion of a combative sport", the BBC reports. Slap-happy females went at it with gusto in return for concert tickets or up to $5k.

For its trouble, WQHT Hot 97 now has to stump up $240k - part of which will go to a "domestic violence awareness charity". A suitably pleased Spitzer declared: "The law establishes set boundaries that cannot be crossed to protect our community's health and safety," further announcing: "This agreement should be a wake-up call to all those in the entertainment industry who think outrageousness is a clever marketing strategy."

Quite right too. Perhaps Mr Spitzer might like to turn his Matthew Hopkinsesque attentions to the UK's Big Brother - where Channel 4 encourages the socially inadequate to take off their clothes and simulate sex with plastic inflatable animals - or indeed he could take the time to watch CBS News which commonly airs footage of Sunni insurgents blowing themselves up in an attempt to win VIP passes to paradise. We are likewise reminded of the sickening - and often televised - public spectacle of grown men punching each other into comas purely for financial gain. Let's face it, "outrageous" doesn't even begin to describe biting off Evander Holyfield's ear.

As for the suitably-ashamed WQHT Hot 97, a spokesperson for owner Emmis Radio noted the contestants were all volunteers but conceded: "It was not our finest hour, and New York City deserves better."

Nah. Young women slapping themselves to win cash is exactly what New York deserves, and quite possibly needs. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Och aye! It's the Loch Ness Monster – but only Apple fanbois can see it
Fondleslab-friendly beastie's wake spotted... OR WAS IT?
Japanese boffin EYES up big bucks with strap-on digi-glasses
AgencyGlass saddles user with creepy OLED display
Sleuths find nosy NORKS drones on the Chinternet
UAVs likely to have been made in the Middle Kingdom
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Dorian Nakamoto gets $23,000 payout over Bitcoin invention saga
Maintains he didn't create cryptocurrency, but will join community
Pirate Bay's 10 millionth upload: Colour us shocked, a SMUT FLICK
P2P badboys show online piracy is alive and humping
Teen girl arrested with 70-year-old man's four inch weapon inside her
Charged with introducing .22 snubbie to penile facility. It wasn't firing blanks
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.